Crime Odds Nearly Triple for those with Disabilities

By Shaun Heasley ~ disabilityscoop.com

The number of violent crimes committed against people with disabilities is on   the rise, new government data indicates.

The U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Statistics said that there   were 1.3 million nonfatal violent crimes against persons with disabilities in   2012, up from the roughly 1.1 million estimated for 2011.

The findings come from the National Crime Victimization Survey, which is   conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau and asks about experiences with crime —   whether reported or unreported to police — among those age 12 and older   living in the community.

Individuals with disabilities encountered violent crime at nearly three times   the rate of those in the general population. Simple assaults were the most   commonly cited crime against this group followed by robbery, aggravated   assault and rape or sexual assault.

Those with cognitive disabilities had the highest rate of victimization and   about half of violent crime victims with disabilities had multiple   conditions, the Bureau of Justice Statistics said.

The detailed report on crime against persons with disabilities can be viewed   here: report.

Super powered people with disabilities

If you have enjoyed the profiles of courage articles and information ILSNC has shared here on the website, there is a great article on historic precedents set by some other people with disabilities, of super powered people with disabilities.  They all knew they had disabilities, but it did not stop them from persevering and achieving what they wanted to do.  You may read and view it at the shared link just below. 

http://www.cracked.com/article_18624_5-people-who-turned-awful-disabilities-into-superpowers_p2.html

Consumer Advisory Committee

ILSNC is requesting assistance in locating a consumer (must be receiving Medi-Cal and live in Shasta, Siskiyou, Lassen or Modoc counties) to be a consumer representative on the Consumer Advisory Committee with Partnership HealthPlan.  Partnership’s offices are near the airport in South Redding.  The meetings occur every other month.  This is a real need.  Professional advocates are invited to attend, but the real power lies in the hands of the consumer.  Please find a worthy representative.  They need not be a consumer of ours, but must be on Medi-Cal from one of the 4 counties.  Information can be obtained by contacting Kelley Sewell, Northern Region Member Services and Provider Relations Director. 

She can be reached at: 

Partnership HealthPlan of California

PO Box 492475

Redding, CA 96049

Phone:  (707) 420-7685 phone

E-mail:ksewell@partnershiphp.org

Our website: www.partnershiphp.org

The Disability Organizing Network (www.disabilityorganizing.net) is embarking on a quest to populate local Voting Advisory Committees throughout the state.  We cannot do much outside of our major population centers, but since Shasta & Tehama counties are combining their efforts, can we locate 1 or 2 disabled folks to serve on this committee?  This activity is coordinated by the Secretary of State’s office through each county and is active every other year.  2014 is an election year, so this is the year to ensure that various disabilities are represented on local boards.  For information, please contact  Cathy Darling Allen, Shasta County Clerk @  225-5166.

 

DISABILITY TOPS WORLD HEALTH TRENDS

EARLY DEATH REPLACED BY DISABILITY AS MOST SIGNIFICANT HEALTH RISK

“The health of most of the planet’s population is rapidly coming to resemble that of the United States, where death in childhood is rare, too much food is a bigger problem than too little, and life is long and often darkened by disability.

Delicious

Delicious


“High blood pressure is now the leading ‘risk factor’ for disease around the world.  Alcohol use is third.  Low-back pain now causes more disability than childbirth complications or anemia.

“We are in transition to a world where disability is the dominant concern as opposed to premature death, said Christopher Murray, who headed the Global Burden of Disease Study, published on [December 13, 2012].

“The pace of change is such that we are ill prepared to deal with what the burden of disease is now in most places.

“The risk of dying prematurely from many ‘adult diseases’ (such as heart attacks and cancer) has also fallen because of better treatment and prevention.  As a result, the average age of the world’s population is getting older.  Soon after 2015, for the first time in history, there will be more people older than 65 than younger than 5.  That has had two consequences.

“More people are surviving to die of diseases that occur only in old age. . . . At the same time, people are living with conditions that don’t kill them, but that do affect their health.

obesity rate increase cartoon-resized-600


” . . . the study should prompt us to think hard about what are the major causes of disability today, and what are the possible solutions that can accelerate progress against them.”


The independent living movement will be challenged to modify our advocacy to account for these changes.  During the first half of the 20th Century, polio was one of the most dreaded childhood diseases.  A handful of polio survivors were among the first leaders of our movement.  As polio and other infectious diseases are reduced or eliminated, new mostly chronic diseases occupy our attention and healthcare resources.  Going forward, we will be required to expand our scope of practice to include advocacy for the full range of disabled citizens.  In order to maintain our effectiveness, it seems to be incumbent upon us that we play a partnership role in reducing the incidence and severity of these mostly preventable diseases.  


The full newspaper account can be read at:
  http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20121217/entlife/712179975


To access the summaries or full studies from The Lancet, go to:
http://www.thelancet.com/themed/global-burden-of-disease