Around Chico

 

 

Lots of outreach being done in our communities. If you wish a presentation of DAC programs and services please let us know. DAC counties include Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Lassen, Modoc, Plumas, Shasta, Siskiyou, and Tehama. Chico Office (530) 893-8527 and Redding Office (530) 242-8550. Thanks!

Harmonic Humanity Music Program Employing the Homeless

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/harmonic-humanity-music-program-employing-the-homeless

MUSIC WITH A SOCIAL MISSION: To build an active community and a social structure to provide employment for the homeless by leveraging their power of music.

SOME OF OUR SUPPORTERS INCLUDE: JOHN BUTLER TRIO, MICHAEL FRANTI, MAROON 5, JASON MRAZ, SOJA, KATIE GRAY, JEAN HOUSTON, MICHAEL & RICKIE BECKWITH, JAMES O’DEA.

U. S. SENATE BILL 1356 MATTERS

What is U. S. Senate Bill 1356? Why does it matter?

It is a comprehensive act named the Workforce Reinvestment Act. Part of the act includes authorization of the Rehabilitation Act, essential to providing the funding for and structure governing the Independent Living Centers across the country.

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Information, including fact sheets and links to take action, are available at:
http://www.ncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/RehabActTalkingPointsAugust2013.pdf

“Veteran’s Housing Employment & Resource Fair” – Redding

January 29, 2014 Wednesday 10am-3pm

Veterans Memorial Hall 1605 Yuba St. Redding

next to the downtown post office

“Every Veteran is Welcome!”

“Ever served in the U.S. Armed Forces?  Or were in the National Guard or a Reservist deployed to Active Duty?  Then you are a Veteran, and you can find out about new local services at the Veteran’s Housing Employment Resource Fair.” 

“There are many new programs and services for you, and you may now be eligible because guidelines have expanded!”

 

ILSNC PARTNERS TO BUILD ACCESSIBLE GARDEN SPACE

CHICO — In an empty field in northwest Chico, Mark Stemen has visions of towering tomatoes, sprawling squash and fabulous flowers sprouting from the ground.

The Oak Way Community Garden, at West Eighth and Nord avenues, has already connected to water, had its soiled tilled and a cover crop planted by volunteers, and is now at the fourth step — fundraising. When completed, the Oak Way project will be the city’s second largest community garden.

“This is an opportunity for us to enable people to come out and grow their own food,” said Stemen, Butte Environmental Council board president, local activist and Chico State University professor whose Geography 498 students have helped lead this project. “This one is really well-planned and it models exactly after the Humboldt garden.”

Cover Crop Watering

Cover Crop Watering

“For us, the most important word in community garden isn’t garden,” Stemen said. “The biggest thing here is we are going to grow community.”

A major highlight is the garden will be universally accessible, with easy access to those with disabilities or senior citizens. As part of that goal, BEC has partnered with Independent Living Services of Northern California, which sees community agriculture as a new method for health and independence for people with disabilities.

“For people that are on a fixed income, cheap food is usually the lousy food,” said ILSNC Executive Director Evan LeVang. “This provides a new avenue for people who traditionally don’t have access to affordable, healthy good food as well as the knowledge on how to purchase and prepare it.”

Community gardens also create opportunities to enjoy fresh air, exercise, socialize, improve self-esteem and have access to fresh produce, he said.  “We sit on really good land; there is available water and we are in an agricultural area,” LeVang said. “For our folks we serve to be part of this agricultural economy and movement toward small farming is really exciting … I think we are at the front edge of a coming wave.”

People interested in supporting the Oak Way Community Garden or getting on its wait list can contact BEC at (530) 891-6424 or http://www.becnet.org/oak-way-community-garden

Above material is abridged from an original article in the Chico Enterprise-Record.  It can be viewed at:  http://www.chicoer.com/news/ci_24806688/community-garden-chico-grows-fundraising-stage

EXTRAORDINARY PERSEVERANCE

Greg Wells

Greg Wells

It’s been a long road—10 years long, to be exact—but Greg Wells’ perseverance will pay off next week as he joins the Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences Class of 2013.

Wells, who uses a wheelchair, was paralyzed at the age of 15 in a high school wrestling accident and also has a documented learning disability. These challenges, he says, make everything a little bit harder, but by staying true to his mantras of “keep going” and “never give up,” he has overcome them in a way that’s impressive by any standard.

“I knew getting a college education was a must,” Wells says. “Hearing people say, ‘You’re not going to be able to achieve “X” or having professors tell me, ‘Maybe this major isn’t for you’ only motivated me to push past the status quo.”

Wells, after attending CSU, Chico on and off since 2002, will be graduating with bachelor’s degrees in social work, psychology, and social science, and a minor in family relations. His progress was put on hold time and time again by illness, extensive surgery, and recovery, but he attributes his ability to stay motivated to his inner strength, faith, and family support and encouragement.

“Things happen in life,” Wells says. “It’s how you deal with those things that determines what kind of person you are. When you fall, how do you pick yourself up? That defines your character.”

Wells is passionate about continuing his education and intends to apply to the master’s program in psychology, marriage and family therapy. He also plans to build on his experience interning with Independent Living Services of Northern California by continuing to work in the human service field with his current degrees. He hopes to eventually have his own practice and work full time.

“I could be a very angry person,” he says, “but everybody has challenges. I’ve gotten this far—there’s no point in me quitting now.”

– Kacey Gardner, Public Affairs and Publications

California State University, Chico

400 West First Street
Chico, CA 95929-0010
E-mail: insidechicostate@csuchico.edu

IN-HOME SUPPORTIVE SERVICES (IHSS) SUIT SETTLED

NOTICE REGARDING IN-HOME SUPPORTIVE SERVICES (IHSS)

In 2009, the State of California tried to cut IHSS domestic and related hours and to cut funds for IHSS workers who make more than $9.50 an hour. In 2011, the State tried to cut IHSS hours by 20%.

Consumer feeding

In response, IHSS recipients and labor unions filed lawsuits. They won temporary orders stopping the cuts. The State appealed the lawsuits. No one knows if the courts would allow the cuts or not. Now there is a settlement. If the court approves the settlement:

• There will be no 20% cut in IHSS hours. There will be a one-year cut of 8% starting around July 1, 2013. This is 4.4% below current hours because there is already a cut of 3.6% that is not part of these lawsuits. (3.6% + 4.4% = 8%).

wheelchair-dog
• Around July 2014, the cut in IHSS hours will go down to 7%. (3.4% on top of the 3.6% current cut).

• There will be no cuts in State funding for IHSS wages.

• You CAN ask the county for extra hours if your circumstances change.

 

TO GET MORE DETAILS OR FILE AN OBJECTION WITH THE COURT:

You can get a copy of the class notice and the settlement agreement from your county welfare office, public authority or online at: DOWNLOAD IHSS SETTLEMENT CLASS NOTICE

Also, you can get details at these websites: www.disabilityrightsca.org, www.altshulerberzon.com, www.dss.cahwnet.gov, and www.dhcs.ca.gov.
banner-ihssYou can also leave a message for the lawyers representing IHSS recipients at 1-866-752-6679.

THE DEADLINE TO OBJECT TO THE SETTLEMENT IS MAY 3, 2013.

You don’t have to do anything if you do not object to the settlement.